Data Drop #3: Occupations by State (Ninth Census of the U.S.)


This dataset is a transcribed version of the data from Table XXVII of the Ninth Census of the United States, completed in 1870, and contains a state-by-state breakdown of occupation data. The original PDF version of this data can be found here, provided by the U.S. Census Bureau. Though this data was previously inaccessible due to the poor quality of the PDF, it is now publicly available and can be used to explore how statewide workforces have evolved since the end of the 19th century. Consider diving into a single state for a granular approach, or examining how the working population of a region in 1870 has influenced the economy there today.

To transcribe the data, Stacker staff first used Amazon Textract. This returned a typewritten dataset in CSV format, but contained some gaps and some errors. This base transcription was reformatted, corrected, and checked by hand, resulting in this final product.

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Data Drop #2: Flooding risk to National Register of Historic Places


To identify American historic sites located in flood-prone areas, and determine which states are home to the most, Stacker brought together data from the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Risk Index, the National Register of Historic Places, and the Federal Communications Commission.

Our dataset merges the National Risk Index from FEMA with the National Register of Historic Places to identify historic buildings, sites, and districts located in census tracts considered to be at very high or relatively high risk for coastal or riverine flooding. FEMA cited geospatial data, historic occurrence data, and machine-learning models to estimate disaster risk for communities across the U.S.; Stacker looked at what this means for historic areas in at-risk regions.


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Data Drop #1: 1900 Census


This dataset is a transcribed version of the data from Table 33 of the Twelfth Census of the United States, completed in 1900. Though this data was previously inaccessible due to the poor quality of the PDF, it is now publicly available and can be used to explore how statewide communities have evolved since the turn of the last century. Consider diving into a single state for a granular approach, or examining how the demographics of a region in 1900 have impacted the culture there today.

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